文档章节

手贱rm -rf /path/之后,可以这样来

NILYANG
 NILYANG
发布于 2015/10/16 23:58
字数 802
阅读 243
收藏 7
How to recover files I deleted now by running rm *? [duplicate]


This question already has an answer here:
Recovering accidentally deleted files 7 answers
By mistake I ran rm * on the current directory where I created many c program files. I had been working on these since morning. Now I can't take out again the time that I spent since morning on creating the files. Please say how to recover. They aren't in recycle bin also!

ubuntu rm data-recovery
shareimprove this question
edited Feb 21 '14 at 0:33

Braiam
13.9k73778 
asked Nov 15 '13 at 8:56

Ravi
61841334
marked as duplicate by Anthon, jasonwryan, slm♦, Bernhard, rahmu Nov 15 '13 at 22:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2     
Linux/Unix doesn't forgive :) – Jiri Xichtkniha Nov 15 '13 at 9:07
4     
Checkout them from the version control system you use. You use one, right? – choroba Nov 15 '13 at 9:08
2     
There are SOME ways to recover files/data. But most of them is very hard to do. Be sure you don't write any more to the disk or you are doomed completely. – Jiri Xichtkniha Nov 15 '13 at 9:12 
1     
When I did this, when I was young, it was not as bad as I thought. This is how I discovered that most of the time taken to write is in thinking. The second time around there will be less thinking, and you may even improve it. – richard Nov 15 '13 at 9:13
2     
Unmount the file system ASAP to avoid the blocks previously allocated for the deleted files from being overwritten. Assuming the underlying file system is either ext3 or ext4, you might have some luck recovering files using extundelete. – Thomas Nyman Nov 15 '13 at 9:14 
show 9 more comments
2 Answers
activeoldestvotes
up vote
13
down vote
If a running program still has the deleted file open, you can recover the file through the open file descriptor in /proc/[pid]/fd/[num]. To determine if this is the case, you can attempt the following:

$ lsof | grep "/path/to/file"
If the above gives output of the form:

progname 5383 user 22r REG 8,1 16791251 265368 /path/to/file               
take note of the PID in the second column, and the file descriptor number in the fourth column. Using this information you can recover the file by issuing the command:

$ cp /proc/5383/fd/22 /path/to/restored/file
If you're not able to find the file with lsof, you should immediately remount the file system which housed the file read-only:

$ mount -o remount,ro /dev/[partition]
or unmount the file system altogether:

$ umount /dev/[partition]
The reason for this is that as soon as the file has been unlinked, and there are no remaining hard links to the file in question, the underlying file system may free the blocks previously allocated for the deleted file, at which point the blocks may be allocated to another file and their contents overwritten. Ceasing any further writes to the file system is therefore time critical if any recovery is to be possible. If the file system is the root file system or cannot be made read-only or unmounted for some other reason, it might be necessary to shutdown the system (if possible) and continue the recovery from a live environment where you can leave the target file system read-only.

After writes to the file system have been prevented, there is no immediate hurry to attempt the actual recovery. To play it safe, you might want to make a backup of the file system to perform the actual recovery on:

$ dd bs=4M if=/dev/[partition] of=/path/to/backup
The next steps now depend on the file system type. Assuming a typical Ubuntu installation, you most likely have a ext3 or ext4 file system. In this case, you may attempt recovery using extundelete. Recovery may be attempted safely on either the backup, or the raw device, as long as it is not mounted (or it is mounted read-only). DO NOT ATTEMPT RECOVERY FROM A LIVE FILE SYSTEM. This will most likely bring the file system to an inconsistent state.

extundelete will attempt restore any files it finds to a subdirectory of the current directory named RECOVERED_FILES. Typical usage to restore all deleted files from a backup would be:

$ extundelete /path/to/backup --restore-all

   

   另外参考解决办法原文出处的样子:http://extundelete.sourceforge.net/

本文转载自:http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/101237/how-to-recover-files-i-deleted-now-by-running-rm

共有 人打赏支持
NILYANG
粉丝 14
博文 100
码字总数 19038
作品 0
杭州
高级程序员
运维请注意:”非常危险“的Linux命令大全

导读 Linux命令是一种很有趣且有用的东西,但在你不知道会带来什么后果的时候,它又会显得非常危险。所以,在输入某些命令前,请多多检查再敲回车。 rm –rf rm –rf是删除文件夹和里面附带内...

linux小陶
2016/12/26
3
0
运维请注意:”非常危险“的Linux命令大全

运维请注意:”非常危险“的Linux命令大全 Linux命令是一种很有趣且有用的东西,但在你不知道会带来什么后果的时候,它又会显得非常危险。所以,在输入某些命令前,请多多检查再敲回车。 rm...

飞侠119
2016/12/08
0
0
Linux Shell脚本生产环境下安全地删除文件

脚本编写背景 无论是生产环境、测试环境还是开发环境,经常需要使用rm命令删除&批量一些“重要”目录下的文件。按照Linux的哲学“小即是美”(一个程序只做一件事)+“用户清楚自己做什么”(...

urey_pp
2017/06/29
0
0
9 个使用前必须再三小心的 Linux 命令

Linux shell/terminal 命令非常强大,即使一个简单的命令就可能导致文件夹、文件或者路径文件夹等被删除。 在一些情况下,Linux 甚至不会询问你而直接执行命令,导致你丢失各种数据信息。 一...

oschina
2014/11/06
8.6K
45
Linux下9 个使用前必须再三小心的命令

Linux下9 个使用前必须再三小心的命令 孤独求学人2016-10-144 阅读 命令linux Linux Shell/terminal 命令非常强大,即使一个简单的命令就可能导致文件夹、文件或者路径文件夹等被删除。 在一...

孤独求学人
2016/10/14
0
0

没有更多内容

加载失败,请刷新页面

加载更多

OSX | SafariBookmarksSyncAgent意外退出解决方法

1. 启动系统, 按住⌘-R不松手2. 在实用工具(Utilities)下打开终端,输入csrutil disable, 然后回车; 你就看到提示系统完整性保护(SIP: System Integrity Protection)已禁用3. 输入reboot回车...

云迹
今天
4
0
面向对象类之间的关系

面向对象类之间的关系:is-a、has-a、use-a is-a关系也叫继承或泛化,比如大雁和鸟类之间的关系就是继承。 has-a关系称为关联关系,例如企鹅在气候寒冷的地方生活,“企鹅”和“气候”就是关...

gackey
今天
4
0
读书(附电子书)|小狗钱钱之白色的拉布拉多

关注公众号,在公众号中回复“小狗钱钱”可免费获得电子书。 一、背景 之前写了一篇文章 《小狗钱钱》 理财小白应该读的一本书,那时候我才看那本书,现在看了一大半了,发现这本书确实不错,...

tiankonguse
今天
4
0
Permissions 0777 for ‘***’ are too open

异常显示: @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ WARNING: UNPROTECTED PRIVATE KEY FILE! @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ ......

李玉长
今天
5
0
区块链10年了,还未落地,它失败了吗?

导读 几乎每个人,甚至是对通证持怀疑态度的人,都对区块链的技术有积极的看法,因为它有可能改变世界。然而,区块链技术问世已经10年了,我们仍然没有真正的用上区块链技术。 几乎每个人,甚...

问题终结者
今天
4
0

没有更多内容

加载失败,请刷新页面

加载更多

返回顶部
顶部